In The Elite Trainer: Strength Training for the Serious Professional by John Paul Catanzaro, you will learn:

  • Why the state of strength training in North America is outdated, and why the Europeans are many years ahead of us.
  • The value of many fitness certification programs.
  • What key parameters are often overlooked during program design.
  • How to arm yourself with all the necessary tools to construct and put into action an effective strength training program.
  • Which common rule advocated by many personal training organizations is absolutely wrong.
  • How to produce a maximum voluntary contraction without using maximal loads.
  • How to obtain the greatest force a human is capable to produce.
  • The strength difference between competitive maximum and training maximum.
  • How to reduce the strength deficit.
  • Why it is unnecessary for all athletes to acquire extreme levels of strength, and what they should strive for instead.
  • Why too much muscle mass can be detrimental.
  • Who would benefit from high levels of muscle strength and size.
  • Which disciplines require high levels of muscle strength at a relatively low body weight.
  • About the speed and strength continuum, and what is involved for power production.
  • Why muscular endurance and strength-endurance, two terms that are often used interchangeably, are not the same.
  • About the structural and functional adaptations to strength training, what key variables influence these adaptations, and what new evidence reveals about the rate of these adaptations.
  • The time frame for physiological reactions to occur in bone and soft tissue.
  • How training intensity is often misconceived, and how it is defined in strength research.
  • What is truly required to gauge progress in strength training.
  • How the OMNI resistance exercise scale and the Borg RPE scale and category ratio scale can be used in strength training.
  • How to manipulate two training variables to increase intensity, and which three scenarios exist in sport that are influenced by these variables.
  • Why some individuals are only able to activate up to 60% of their muscle fibers while others are able to activate up to 85% of their available fibers.
  • Which percentage of maximum is necessary for advanced athletes to access more muscle fibers and achieve greater speed.
  • Which muscle fibers have the greatest size and strength potential, and how to preferentially recruit these fibers.
  • How to increase motor unit activation.
  • Which training method results in a 15% increase in workload and a 40% strength improvement over conventional training.
  • How to employ all available motor units to lift a weight.
  • When training to failure is appropriate, and who should refrain from this practice.
  • Which three methods can be used to plan workouts in a progressive manner.
  • An efficient approach to loading for advanced trainees.
  • How to properly taper, and the effect of unloading.
  • What training tool can be used to adjust loads in small increments.
  • How to maintain a relatively high work output during a taper session.
  • What is more important than perfection in strength training.
  • What training volume refers to, how it can be expressed, and how these variables differ during a one-hour training session.
  • About the relationship between intensity and volume.
  • Which variables can influence the number of repetitions performed at a given intensity.
  • How the soleus muscle of the calf should be trained for maximum effect.
  • How to determine muscle fiber makeup/distribution in a non-invasive manner, and how to increase the accuracy of these methods.
  • How to increase the accuracy of 1RM prediction formulas, and how to determine which of three formulas is best for you.
  • How to determine whether you should perform high, medium, or low reps predominantly in your training.
  • The percentage of type I and II fibers in various trunk, upper limb, and lower limb muscles.
  • Which muscle contains the lowest percentage of type I fibers, and which one contains the highest.
  • How the triceps should be trained for maximum activation and symmetry, and what trap most females fall into when training their triceps.
  • How to effectively train the rectus abdominus, the "six-pack" muscle of the abdomen, and what mistake most people make.
  • How to train the abdominals as both stabilizers and prime movers while taking into consideration their muscle fiber makeup.
  • Which multi-joint movement for the upper body will produce significant abdominal soreness within 2 days of performing the exercise.
  • Two advanced abdominal exercises that accentuate the eccentric action, and how to tailor these movements for beginners.
  • How to increase the density of training.
  • How to progress in situations where there is limited equipment or resistance increases by large amounts as is the case in many home gyms.
  • Which form of training will increase the metabolic demands on the body resulting in favorable body composition adaptations.
  • How to induce a dominant neural and metabolic effect during training.
  • How repetition maximum (RM) performance and the level of the trainee can influence the training effect.
  • Which repetition range beginners should favor.
  • How the optimal number of repetitions per set changes as training age and strength increase.
  • What is required to increase muscle strength, and what is required to increase muscle size?
  • Why the effect is transient for most muscle gain programs you see in the magazines.
  • How gains in muscle mass can be sustained.
  • Why hypertrophy is different among bodybuilders and strength/power athletes.
  • Which repetition range is optimal to build muscle mass.
  • How the total amount of degraded protein can influence hypertrophy.
  • How exercise or movement pattern can influence the number of repetitions.
  • Which repetition maximum number reflects the upper limit before strength diminishes significantly.
  • What determines the number of sets you should perform of an exercise.
  • How to determine the number of exercises to perform during a workout.
  • How to control overtraining, and what to do under periods of high stress or sickness.
  • What research reveals about single versus multiple sets, and which method is superior to optimize strength and size gains.
  • How training age affects the number of sets necessary to bring about supercompensation.
  • How to increase the magnitude and shorten the time for strength gains.
  • How Prilepin's table can be used to determine the ideal number of sets.
  • What the optimal repetition range is for a given intensity.
  • Three factors that dictate when to terminate an exercise.
  • Who developed the original concept of tempo in strength training, and how it is represented in programs today.
  • What a "V" and "X" designation stands for in tempo prescription.
  • What condition must be met in order to truly gauge whether strength was acquired from one workout to the next.
  • What to do when a trainee is no longer able to execute at an assigned tempo.
  • Which tool can be used to keep cadence uniform throughout a movement.
  • Which training parameters are quite often neglected.
  • How altering the speed of muscular contractions can have metabolic, neural, and hormonal effects.
  • How to increase energy consumption during a squat.
  • How to preferentially recruit the brachialis, brachioradialis, and biceps brachii by manipulating the tempo.
  • How slow and fast movements affect concentrations of plasma epinephrine, serum growth hormone (GH), free testosterone, and cortisol levels.
  • How exercise tempo influences the rate of increase in strength.
  • Which tempos should be favored by strength and power athletes and advanced trainees with over two years of training experience.
  • Which methods to incorporate to break a training plateau.
  • What German sports physiologist Dr. Dietmar Schmidtbleicher recommends to bring about strength increases at a faster and higher magnitude.
  • What training distribution of concentric, eccentric, and isometric actions is recommended by Russian and German researchers.
  • What the relationship is between force and velocity, and what type of training is necessary to achieve the greatest power output.
  • How a combination of different movement tempos in training can maximize results.
  • Why training at an extremely slow velocity is not recommended.
  • What the most important factor is when lifting a heavy load.
  • About compensatory acceleration training (CAT), and what research reveals about this method.
  • How to manage the large strength differential during a pulling exercise between the start of the movement and the end.
  • Why generating momentum can be useful or detrimental when lifting a load.
  • How to use rep speed as a diagnostic.
  • How the transition period between the concentric and eccentric phase of a movement can influence the training effect.
  • How to increase intramuscular tension in the bench press and squat, and how to completely eliminate the plyometric effect from these movements.
  • A method of training that will catapult strength and athletic performance to a new level if used appropriately.
  • The requirements before commencing pure eccentric work, and what the trainee as well as the spotter(s) require during eccentric training.
  • How eccentric loading can be reduced and even eliminated in training, and a useful method for beginners to avoid muscle soreness.
  • How to implement eccentric training with advanced athletes, and what rule must be followed for safety purposes during this method.
  • How many body parts should be trained with eccentric emphasis, and how to accommodate greater recovery between eccentric workouts.
  • The top three methods of eccentric training, and which is the most practical.
  • Which tool demonstrates the greatest risk and the greatest reward in strength training, and how can it be used to rehabilitate an injury.
  • Solo applications for eccentric training.
  • How time under tension (TUT) is calculated, and what the ideal TUT is for strength, power, hypertrophy, and endurance.
  • How training age and TUT can influence the training effect.
  • Why strength and power athletes can grow with low reps, and some endurance athletes can grow with high reps.
  • How much force (tension) is required to elicit a significant training effect.
  • Two different methods of strength training using maximal and submaximal loads to induce hypertrophy.
  • About autoregulation of work, and how this method can be used for any training effect you seek.
  • The ideal drop off rate percentage to use for maximum strength, power, and hypertrophy to maintain quality of training.
  • Which parameter can have a major impact on training performance and outcome and is often ignored.
  • How to determine the rest interval between sets.
  • What type of relationship exists between the number repetitions performed and the rest interval between sets.
  • How much rest is required for sufficient recovery, and why you should never strive for complete recovery.
  • How much rest will cause tissue temperature to drop significantly requiring another warm-up.
  • What you should do between sets to occupy lengthy rest intervals.
  • About insufficient recovery, and the benefits of short rest intervals.
  • Which resistance training protocols produce the greatest acute hormonal elevations of testosterone and GH.
  • What the best compromise is to avoid a significant decline in performance and yet maximize anabolic hormone production.
  • How to increase GH by twenty-fold, about the same amount that is released early in sleep, with exercise.
  • Which specific rest interval allows the use of greater intensities and improves the ability to sustain repetitions, resulting in a higher training volume and greater gains in muscular strength.
  • How much longer the central nervous system (CNS) takes to recover compared to the metabolic system.
  • The condition that can cause neural drive and fuel for contraction, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and creatine phosphate (CP), to be less than optimal.
  • What the suggested recovery times are after exhaustive strength training.
  • How much rest to take when you move quickly from one exercise to the next, and why even a small amount of rest is important.
  • How work capacity and recovery ability differ among individuals.
  • How to increase tolerance to lactic acid and train the body to use more for fuel.
  • How the Soviets and Bulgarians determine rest intervals.
  • The rest interval solution to improve recovery between high rep and low rep sets.
  • How to perform more work in any given time frame and significantly reduce the duration of your workout.
  • Which exercises optimize training efficiency and offer more results for your effort.
  • Which movements can serve as benchmark exercises to provide valuable information of strength imbalances.
  • How to determine structural balance throughout the body, and what signals a red flag that should be addressed through training.
  • What the 85% strength variation and the red flag prescription are.
  • What to exploit if you wish to maximize size and strength gains.
  • Which exercises heavily recruit the gastrocnemius according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electromyographic (EMG) analysis.
  • How many muscles the squat activates, and what is important in each program for continual progress.
  • How many muscles act synergistically during an arm curl, and how you can alter their contribution.
  • How even slight exercise variations alter muscle recruitment, and how you can target specific muscles by changing the way an exercise is performed.
  • How weight distribution can influence muscle activity.
  • How the sticking point of an exercise can help determine the weak link of a muscle chain, and how to encourage strength gains in these areas.
  • How to assess a muscle imbalance, and when it should be corrected.
  • The best diagnostic tools to assess both strength and flexibility.
  • About the 300-400-500 strength standard, and why these standards are unnecessary for certain athletes.
  • How bench angle and grip width affect pressing strength, and how grip orientation and width affect chin-up and pull-up strength.
  • Which exercises are stressful to the shoulders and should be avoided.
  • The difference between a chin-up and a pull-up, and what you should not do on either version.
  • How stance, grip width, and depth of movement affect strength on deadlifts and squats.
  • A simple adjustment to increase range of motion on the deadlift.
  • What is important in strength training to make continual progress.
  • How to get through an entire year without ever repeating the same exercise performed in the same manner.
  • Over 500 exercise variations for thighs (quadriceps and hamstrings), hips lower back, calves, shins, upper back, chest, shoulders, upper arms (biceps, brachioradialis, brachialis, triceps), forearms, and abdominals.
  • How to increase the recruitment of the quadriceps and the posterior chain during a squat.
  • How to accommodate individuals with tight hip flexors on the split squat, and which variation will produce an extreme hip flexor stretch.
  • How turning the feet inward or outward influence the overload on the different heads of the hamstrings, and what happens to the hamstrings during knee flexion with the ankle(s) fixed in plantarflexion.
  • How to increase the stretch on the calves and hamstrings during a semi-stiff-leg deadlift.
  • How to increase the involvement of the gastrocnemius and soleus during a calf raise.
  • How turning the feet inward or outward or using a close or wide stance on the standing calf raise can influence activation of the gastrocnemius.
  • How to perform a one-arm rotary dumbbell row.
  • The advantages to using a neutral-grip on the dumbbell press.
  • What a Buchberger and Telle external rotation is, and why these exercises are useful.
  • How to alter shoulder training due to the heavy use of pressing movements in most strength training programs.
  • The difference between closed-grip and open-grip kettlebell curls, and why these exercises make an excellent alternative to dumbbell curls.
  • How to properly perform the wrist roller exercise.
  • Which two core movements in the transverse plane should favor a TUT rather than a repetition number.
  • Why performing Olympic lifts during strength training is not absolutely mandatory to improve athletic performance in other sports.
  • What you must focus on to make any lift (not just Olympic lifts) explosive.
  • What peer-reviewed research reveals on the effectiveness of explosive exercises, such as Olympic style weightlifting, compared to traditional, slow and heavy weight training in enhancing muscle power and athletic performance.
  • What is essential if you plan to perform Olympic lifts in training.The rules of exercise sequence for maximum results.
  • The difference between a closed kinetic chain and open kinetic chain movement, and why one is superior over the other.
  • Why controversy exists whether the abdominals should be trained first in a workout or not, and what the answer is.
  • Various forms of sequencing, and how to order your exercises when training in a busy gym, especially during peak hours.
  • Why reciprocal pairing is effective for strength and hypertrophy gains, and why staggered pairing is effective for body composition changes.
  • Who benefits from circuit training, and what complex training is useful for.
  • How to alter the sequence within a program by rotating the order of exercises among workouts.
  • How to select the proper load to use for a set, and where most programs go wrong.
  • Some of the more popular methods of loading in strength training.
  • What can influence the amount of weight used and the subsequent training effect.
  • The difference between horizontal sequence and vertical sequence, and how they influence hypertrophy.
  • How to maintain consistent repetition performance and achieve greater workloads over a number of sets.
  • How to conduct precise load calculations.
  • About the bilateral deficit, how high it can range, and how it can be reduced and even eliminated in some cases.
  • How resistance can be accommodated using bands and chains.
  • Which three groups of individuals will benefit greatly from accommodating assistance, and how it is conducted with bands.
  • Which factors influence performance on chin-ups and pull-ups.
  • How long workouts should be, and why.
  • What is compromised after an hour of intense activity.
  • The testosterone and GH response during one hour of intense exercise.
  • What common practice is counterproductive to long-term success in strength training.
  • How many workouts to perform in a day, week, and month for maximum effect.
  • Which two supplements are useful to control cortisol levels and extend the duration of a workout.
  • How long a strength training program can be effective for, and when should you change a routine.
  • Why it is not ideal to change a program too frequently or stay on one too long.
  • Which factors influence program duration.
  • What relationship exists between training frequency and intensity.
  • Which factors influence recovery.
  • What Russian and Eastern European lifters do to enhance recovery that North Americans often ignore.
  • What must occur after every workout for optimal results, how performance is enhanced, and what the key is to make continual progress.
  • What ultimately determines recovery in strength training, and how to know when it has occurred.
  • Whether an absence of muscle soreness is mandatory for optimal recovery.
  • About the recovery index.
  • Two tests that can be used prior to upper body and lower body training to determine if sufficient recovery has occurred.
  • Which conditions should cause you to postpone high-intensity training for that day.
  • About the frequency paradox, and how you can accomplish more frequent workouts at a higher intensity and yet recover sufficiently between training sessions.
  • About the relationship between training level and frequency for absolute and relative strength.
  • How often a beginner, intermediate, and advanced level athlete should train.
  • How to plan more recovery time between workouts as training age and strength increases.
  • Which exercise involves both functions of the hamstrings, and how can you accommodate an individual who is unable to complete one concentric repetition with their body weight.
  • What a variable recovery system is, and how you can plan training to accommodate it.
  • The training principles that are important when trying to develop a skill such as Olympic weightlifting.
  • The advantages of a bodybuilding system.
  • What most individuals should avoid in training if they wish to succeed.
  • How much strength is preserved after a period of detraining.
  • How North American powerlifters differ from Russian powerlifters when training the bench press.
  • Which two factors are involved for any training effect you seek.
  • What happens if you train before full compensation occurs.
  • Why frequency should not be rigid.
  • About periodization, and why is it important to arrive to the gym with a plan.
  • What the downfall of planning too far in advance is.
  • What a typical periodized plan is for athletes, what the pros and cons are, and a more efficient approach.
  • How to organize various training methods for athletes, and what to do when a primary training component is being emphasized.
  • A major issue associated with lifting maximal loads for a chronic period of time.
  • The signs and symptoms of overtraining that every coach should be aware of, and the predictors of overreaching.
  • How the potential for overtraining is reduced.
  • The three general methods of periodization, and which method is superior according to research.
  • What ultimately determines the duration of a program.
  • What time frame is suggested for significant morphological adaptations to occur when rotating between hypertrophy and strength/power phases.
  • The first thing to consider when designing an exercise program.
  • What the SMART acronym stands for, and why you should focus on process goals.
  • What the initial goal should be if a personal training client wants to look like a model from a magazine advertisement.
  • What you should do if you wish to perform 20 strict chin-ups but have been stuck at around 12 reps for months.
  • What the next step is after a training goal has been established.
  • What strategy can be used to analyze the key biomotor abilities of strength, power, speed, agility, balance, coordination, endurance, and flexibility for work or sport demand.
  • How to improve overall body symmetry and appearance for individuals concerned primarily with aesthetics rather than performance.
  • How to train for athletics, and how to train for bodybuilding.
  • What to focus on when training athletes, and what mistake many athletes make.
  • Why specificity is important in training, but being too specific can be detrimental.
  • What happens if you spend too much time on sport-specific movements.
  • The mistake that most endurance athletes make in the gym.
  • How long it takes to transfer newly acquired strength to sport.
  • Which energy system you should concentrate most of your effort on in training.
  • The contribution of each energy system for many sports.
  • What the primal movement patterns consist of, and why they are important.
  • How to train in a spine friendly manner, and how to train the core as anti-rotators.
  • How many muscle groups should be addressed in your programs.
  • Which movement patterns are emphasized in many programs, and how to strive for balance.
  • How to design routines for all training levels and for various goals, including muscular endurance and body composition, absolute strength and hypertrophy, and relative strength and power.
  • How to list training parameters, such as sequence, exercise, sets, reps, tempo, and rest interval, in your programs.
  • How a beginner and an advanced trainee may conduct a dip, and how a narrow grip and a wide grip influence recruitment.
  • What reverse-grip means on exercises such as pressdowns, pulldowns, rows, arm curls, and wrist curls.
  • What grip and stance width is used on most bilateral movements.
  • How many sets should be performed if a range is indicated.
  • How to perform pyramid training, drop sets, and clusters.
  • How much rest should be taken between the completion of one side and the start of the other side on unilateral exercises, and which side to start with first.
  • Which home-based program will quickly improve muscular endurance and work capacity while shedding body fat and body weight in record time.
  • How to conduct a fat loss program at home with minimal equipment, and which key parameter to manipulate over sessions.
  • How to train two individuals or more at the same time without much equipment or space.
  • Why dumbbell and kettlebell cleans and snatches performed for high repetitions are dangerous.
  • Which abdominal exercise to perform if you suffer with periodic low back pain.
  • Which exercise can be used to promote strength-flexibility in many areas of the human body, and how much weight to use for males and females.
  • What type of routine to perform when traveling and all you have access to is a multi-station in your hotel.
  • What alternative to the supine knee-in can be used on a Swiss ball.
  • An excellent progression to circuit training to further promote muscular endurance and favor body composition changes.
  • How to incorporate three training complexes in one workout.
  • How to maintain body composition and work capacity during a maximum strength phase with this fat loss complex.
  • Four methods to use in a situation where you must perform 100 non-stop push-ups, for example, but can only do 40 or 50 at present.
  • What a ladder technique is.
  • How to control the amount of resistance during a push-away.
  • What a rolling program is.
  • Three alternatives to chin-ups.
  • How to help advanced trainees get out of a training rut if all they focus on is developing relative strength.
  • A unique sequence to prioritize lagging body parts and shock the system.
  • Why the concept of alternating between lower and upper body exercises with hypertrophy parameters is ideal for body composition changes.
  • How the Swiss ball can be used in home gyms with limited space.
  • A routine that utilizes very little equipment – some dumbbells and a Swiss ball is all you need.
  • How to increase the difficulty on mixed-grip chin-ups.
  • How to perform a reverse hyperextension if a dedicated machine is not available.
  • A unique body composition program that can be used by beginners, intermediates, and advanced trainees.
  • Interval training recommendations and a medicine ball circuit that can be used to enhance athletic performance and improve body composition.
  • Three primary versions of step-ups, and how to deter cheating on this exercise.
  • A bodybuilding routine that I started with when I was 15 years old and it is still effective today over twenty years later.
  • What happens if you leave a little in reserve during the initial sets of an exercise.
  • What can be used on any standard chin-up bar to support the arms and allow greater abdominal isolation during various hanging leg or knee lifts, and how can additional resistance be added to these exercises.
  • How to position the body for optimal line of pull during a wrist curl.
  • How to correct a muscular imbalance and even out left-right discrepancies, what ratio of work is necessary to allow the weak side to catch up, and under what conditions should more work should be assigned to the weaker side.
  • How to attain full range of motion during a split squat.
  • How to properly perform the Zottman curl.
  • How to accommodate individuals with large arms on a front squat.
  • A safe approach when performing a pullover.
  • The difference between pre-exhaustion and post-exhaustion, and which method is more effective for hypertrophy.
  • How to adjust the loads from one set to the next to maintain performance.
  • The advantages of performing an abdominal crunch over a Swiss ball.
  • What should be done during a preacher curl to maintain tension on the working muscles.
  • How holistic sets can be used to target a wide range of motor units.
  • The positions of flexion protocol, and how it can trigger maximum fiber recruitment and other key anabolic mechanisms.
  • Several exercises that overload the midrange, stretch, and contracted positions for the quadriceps, hamstrings, upper back, mid back, chest, shoulders, biceps, triceps, abdominals, and calves.
  • An absolute strength split geared for trainees who wish to increase both size and strength without any concern about their body weight.
  • How to extend the TUT as you fatigue during a dumbbell lateral raise.
  • A great exercise for the obliques and quadratus lumborum muscles using the Swiss ball.
  • A three-day volume training split for intermediate and advanced trainees only.
  • How to maintain performance when maximum loads are used and every set is taken to the limit.
  • What condition must occur in order to terminate an exercise before all sets are completed.
  • How to determine the frequency of training, and which three scenarios exist to suit your level of recovery.
  • When an extra day of recovery is required.
  • How to load during a back extension.
  • A much better option to increase abdominal involvement during the knee-in exercise.
  • What escalating density training is all about, how to improve the efficiency of the system, and two splits that can be used on trainees of all levels.
  • How double split training is a potent hypertrophy protocol.
  • What to consume before, during, and after your workouts.
  • How to quench free-radicals immediately after a workout without taking any supplements.
  • Various restorative measures that can be used daily.
  • One of the most powerful recovery boosters post-workout.
  • How to improve sleep habits, and one simple method to perk you up quickly after a nap.
  • How much time is ideal between two workouts in a day.
  • How to allow overcompensation of muscle glycogen stores to occur.
  • An ideal program for someone in their late teens or early twenties who has the summer off of school and needs to put on some size.
  • A three-day bulk and power split that is extremely effective with only three exercises per workout.
  • A four-day split that Anthony Ditillo claims is the best routine he has come across for increasing bulk and power simultaneously.
  • Why shoulder pain is common with overhead presses, and what to do about it.
  • How to tap into high-threshold motor units through the process of postactivation potentiation and increase performance.
  • A form of sequencing that improves recovery between sets.
  • How to incorporate a conjugate system and train various motor qualities simultaneously.
  • A four-day strength and size split where all exercises can be performed in a simple weight room.
  • Why free weight training has the greatest carryover to sport and can produce significantly more (functional) hypertrophy than machine training.
  • How to improve stability and increase strength during one-arm movements.
  • What the isometronics system involves, how it can promote rapid strength and mass gains, and why it should not be used often in a training year.
  • How to place yourself in the strongest position during the standing military press.
  • How a combination of heavy (high load, low velocity) resistance training and explosive (low load, high velocity) resistance training can enhance muscular power and athletic performance.
  • A three-day contrast training split that takes advantage of postactivation potentiation (also referred to post-tetanic facilitation).
  • Why long rest intervals are necessary for optimal performance during contrast training, and what to do with individuals who find it difficult to rest 3-5 minutes between sets for sufficient recovery.
  • How this activity performed during the rest interval can facilitate faster recovery of the prime movers.
  • How to increase knee flexion and range of motion during a bent-knee deadlift.
  • How to determine the width of a snatch-grip deadlift.
  • What full range of motion means during a close-grip neck press.
  • A three-day relative strength split for advanced trainees who wish to gain strength without increasing their body weight.
  • How to manipulate the weight over a number of sets with wave-like loading.
  • How to increase the demand on a box jump without increasing the load, and what height the box should be set at.
  • How to utilize interrepetition rest intervals (often referred to as cluster training or rest-pause training) to enable higher workloads and greater power output.
  • The Hepburn training system along with two alternative routines for maximum size and strength development.
  • Which movements require a strong contribution from the abdominals to stabilize the core.
  • Which exercises develop tension in the stabilizers that equal or even exceed the prime movers.
  • How a high intensity of training for a large number of sets can produce great results.
  • Six advanced body composition routines, including four-day, three-day, and two-day split routines.
  • Nine advanced size and strength routines, including two-program, three-program, and four-program rotations.
  • What additional element can be added to the seated rope row to neck to improve shoulder health and integrity.
  • How to eliminate common mistakes and reduce stress on the lower back during a bent-over lateral raise.
  • A variation of the seated good morning for an extreme calf and hamstring stretch.
  • What a statue of liberty dumbbell squat is, and how it can be used to heighten the stretch on the hip flexors.
  • What the advantages are of using a neutral grip on the standing rope face pull.
  • How to maximize the stretch during an overhead triceps extensions (also known as a French press).
  • How to make the Swiss ball tiger bend push-up less difficult and more challenging.
  • An effective exercise to work the posterior chain of muscles (spinal erectors, glutes, and hamstrings).
  • When to terminate a set during the seated one-arm cable external rotation.
  • Which gripping device can be adjusted to create over 50 different levels of resistance.
  • How to load during a one-leg calf raise.
  • How to increase the resistance on suspended-chain push-ups and chin-ups.
  • This simple tip when performing a shoulder external rotation exercise that will help maintain a stable arm position, reduce deltoid involvement (through reciprocal inhibition), and improve the blood supply to the working muscles.
  • How to protect the spine during the woodchop exercise.
  • Which training device reduces the involvement of the deltoids during an abducted external rotation to allow greater isolation of the teres minor and infraspinatus muscles.
  • How an adjustable step unit can be useful for many applications, including some upper body exercises.
  • Why alternating between extensive (high volume) and intensive (high intensity) phases can maximize size and strength gains.
  • Which closed kinetic chain movements contribute significantly to the upper body development of both males and females.
  • What self-fulfilling prophecy is common among women who strength train.
  • How many chin-ups the average female can perform, and how to improve this number.
  • The strength ratio of women compared to men in the lower body and upper body.
  • A good approach to use with female trainees who are concerned about gaining too much size in their lower body.
  • A three-month progression for females with emphasis on upper body training.
  • How to encourage lower abdominal activity against the strong pull of the psoas during a supine knee-in.
  • Which deadlift variation reduces stress on the lower back.
  • How to offer assistance on chin-ups and dips.
  • Which three pieces of equipment can be used for the abdominal rollout exercise.
  • The advantages of proper resistance training before puberty, and how training should be conducted during this stage of development.
  • How much force is incurred when children play, and how to prevent sports-related injuries.
  • A long-term periodization plan of training for different stages of development.
  • A strength training program that is appropriate for children.
  • Which tools to use when training children.
  • Why the myth that aerobic training burns more fat than strength training is inaccurate.
  • How to increase resting metabolic rate for an extended period of time.
  • What research indicates about concurrent strength and endurance training.
  • What type of training can be an asset for endurance athletes by improving muscle power, work economy, and speed of movement, and what can be counterproductive to the training objectives of athletes involved in anaerobic sports.
  • What method of training is the safest and most effective to improve cardiovascular health.
  • How strength training is protective to the heart.
  • What is necessary in order to truly determine whether progress is being made during training.
  • What should be recorded in a training log.
  • The basic premise of strength training.
  • How resistance may be encountered through various means.
  • What will determine the success of any strength training program.
  • What happens when most people feel that they can design their own training programs without consulting a professional, and why results are not always guaranteed when an expert is finally called upon.
  • What is the primary source of information for most personal trainers, and how to stay current with information of today.
  • How to bridge the gap between theory and practice, and achieve results with strength training.
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